You Are What You Seek

Many of us search for purpose, and within that search we are often focused on a method to get there, or a teacher to guide us. Often it is believed that the solution, and the answers, are found externally. We emulate others, copy friends, try to reform ourselves into what we see as the way… Read More

Featured Faculty: Heidi Eckerson

After living in the past (and her head) for over a decade teaching history, Heidi decided a change was in order. Attending FLSM reminded her about the importance of being present and allowed her to get reacquainted with the rest of her body. After graduating in 2012, she opened a private practice where she is… Read More

Student Spotlight: Part-time Evening 2017

Samantha Spaulding, Micheryl Blake, Brian Alexander and Kristen Angell make up all of our Part-Time Evening Program at the Finger Lakes School of Massage . This small yet mighty group of four students are known around our Ithaca campus for their focus, dedication and teamwork–leaning in and supporting each other beautifully during their time in our massage program. They make an exceptional team and that is why they are collectively our December Students of the Month. They are so in sync, they have even answered the following questions as a group.

New ways to Learn ~ FLSM and Perceptual Thinking Patterns

Have you ever thought about going back to school but remember not feeling like you were really good at being a student? It is common for adults to recall their time in High School without the warm and fuzzy feelings of nostalgia. Often school, and learning, were painful processes, and thinking about going to school again can be daunting or bring up old memories full of fear and inadequacy. Here at Finger Lakes School of Massage we pride ourselves on individualized education, within the parameters of high standards. We are able to hold these high expectations because we teach our students about HOW they learn.

Interdependence

It is a myth, this American experience of fierce individualism, with an end goal of independence. Society behaves as if we should strive to reach independence in this lifetime and that it is a true measure of greatness; independent thinkers, independently wealthy, independently owned and operated. We even measure children’s growth by milestones of independence. The truth is that no one is ever truly independent, this focus on “the self” causes suffering. The expectation of being self-sufficient, not ever met, is often a source of frustration and resentment. If we changed our thinking towards interdependence we are so much more likely to have reasonable expectations of each other and society. We learn to lean on each other in order to move forward.